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A (Very) Brief History of Homes

In this 3-minute read, we discover a little history behind the places we call homes.

Two years ago, this week, one of the world’s brightest minds passed away on 14 March 2018.

Professor Stephen Hawking was a genius and his best-selling book A Brief History of Time introduced readers to scientific theories that he, thankfully for most of us, simplified.

At Cook Residential we can’t share our knowledge on the Big Bang or Black Holes, but we can remember Professor Hawking by taking you on A Brief History of Homes.

From Mammoths to Mosaics

In the Ice Age, early humans lived in caves. That progressed to dwellings covered with mammoth skins and supported by mammoth bones.

By around 4000 BC people had ‘upgraded’ to huts made from stone with primitive versions of thatched roofs.

Fast forward to Ancient Rome, where we see the rise, literally, of apartments. Poor Romans lived in blocks up to five stories high, which were often badly built with roofs that regularly caved in.

In Britain, during the Roman days, wealthy people built homes inspired by villas in Rome featuring pillars, mosaics and even a first foray into central heating.

Middle Ages to the 1800s

In the Middle Ages, a typical British home had no windows, had a space for livestock and pillows were a luxury for the rich with peasants making do with resting their heads on wooden logs.

The 19th century is recognised as a time when housing for poor people in Britain was particularly dreadful.

But those who were wealthy lived in Victorian houses, some of which we still live in today. Those homes were built during the reign of Queen Victoria between 1837-1901.

February was an extremely busy month for the team, phones were ringing off the hook, sales were being tied up and new properties were being launched almost every working day! Well done team CR! Great result! 

 

Will Brexit have an impact on the value of your Cheltenham home? In this 2-minute read, we look at the effect leaving the EU has had on the property market, and if there will be a ‘Brexit bounce’ for house prices in Cheltenham.
 
Love it or loathe it, or simply sick to the back teeth of it, Brexit is happening.
 
But what impact will the UK leaving the European Union have on the property market in Cheltenham? Like most long-term forecasts, no one knows with absolute certainty, how things will pan out, especially when it comes to the housing market.
It would be disingenuous of us to suggest otherwise.
However, the immediate impact since the General Election has been to see buyer confidence come flooding back. The media have dubbed it the ‘Boris / Brexit Bounce.’
And here’s why. The housing market doesn’t like uncertainty – whether that’s political or financial.
And humans are often inclined to avoid making decisions if we can get away with it. Our minds seek out a reason NOT to do something which might disturb the status quo of our lives.
Especially when things beyond our control seem ‘up in the air.’

What Will Cheltenham’s Homes Look Like in 2030?

In this two-minute read, we gaze into our crystal ball while doing a quick Google search, to see what homes in 2030 might look like, work like and contain.

Back in 1989 the BBC technology show Tomorrow’s World looked at what the average UK home of 2020 would look like.

Its predictions were hit and miss, but they did forecast technology would play a huge part in how we lived.

They said we’d be able to control our lighting, music and heating by voice commands (Alexa, Google Assistant, etc.). That our homes would be more energy efficient (we’re getting there) and that our windows would be able to turn into TV screens at the flick of a switch (not just yet).

And as we ease into the new decade, people who look ahead to see how technology will shape our lives (they’re called futurists), have been making some predictions of their own for the homes of 2030.

In this 90-second read, we reveal why there’s a lot more happening in January than new diets, broken resolutions and returning to normality.

 “Nothing happens in January, does it?”

It’s a question we hear a lot from homeowners in Cheltenham who are thinking of selling but considering putting things off until spring.

While that statement might be true about the number of events on people’s social calendars, it doesn’t apply to the property market because there’s plenty of activity happening.

The truth is January sees five out of the ten busiest property searching days on the internet, according to the portal Rightmove.

The five dates when new home seeking souls hit the web in huge numbers are:

  • 13th January
  • 21st January
  • 27th January
  • 2nd January
  • 12th January

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